An Irish Ancestor … through our French line!

Tadgh Cornelius O’Brennan of Montreal — via Ireland and France — is my ancestor … through my Cadieux family line!

Genealogy is very truly the study of real history.

After Cromwell’s victory in Ireland, he published surrender terms in 1652 allowing Irish soldiers to go abroad to serve in foreign armies not at war with the Commonwealth of England. Most went to the Catholic countries of France or Spain.  Cromwell’s aide Sir William Petty estimated their number at 54,000 men.

So probably began the travels of Tadgh Cornelius O’Brennan. When he arrived in France, the French had no ear for Irish accents or names, and not able to read or write, he became known to them as “Tec Corneille Aubrenan”!

We suppose that when the opportunity to join the settlers in New France came, he jumped at it. Thus he became almost certainly the first Irish settler in New France. The year of emigration is uncertain, but signed contracts show he was at first an unlicensed fur-trader — one of the coureurs des bois (literally, ‘runners of the woods’).

But by 1661 he was already a farm worker on the land of Urbain Tessier. In fact, he was kidnapped that year by the Iroquois, and returned some 7 months later.

To turn New France from simply an exploration into a colony, King Louis XIV was convinced to send dowries for women who would move to New France and marry. The women were call Filles du roi, daughters of the King, because like a father, he was giving their dowry.

When Tec heard that the ship with the first group of Filles du roi was stopping first in Quebec City before Trois Rivieres and then Montreal, he headed off to Quebec City — to find a potential wife. At Quebec City, on September 10, 1670, Fille du roi Jeanne Chartier, daughter of Pierre Chartier and Marie Gaudon of Paris, married ‘Tecq Aubrenaue,’ son of Connehour Aubrenaue and Honorée Iconnehour (probably Connor O’Brennan and Honora O’Connor), of “Diasony,” a small village in Ireland.

Newlyweds Tec Aubry and Jeanne Chartier settled on a farm at Pointe-aux-Trembles on the island of Montreal, then later moved to Lachenaie, north of the island. By the time of the 1681 census, they owned 5 farm animals and 5 acres of land.

The couple had 7 children. The youngest, François, had 14 of his own. Our family descends through his son (Joseph) François, who married Marie Jeanne Boutellier. Their great grandson Louis Aubry’s daughter Elizabeth (Eliza) Aubrey married Antoine Cadieux. (Antoine himself was a descendant of another figure at the beginning of Ville Marie — Montreal. I’ll write about him another time.)

Now that’s some history!

Sounds Like …

One of the surprises in family history research is the way surnames — last names — change rather fluidly across time. It seems, also, that in the early 1900s it was common to give a first name as an way of honoring a relative … and then use a second name. There are a number of charts online for “Irish” “Italian” and “Scottish Naming Patterns” for that time period.

But it’s not just names that end up being freely interpreted! I remember the ON census taker in the middle 1800s who renamed a township … North Gower became North Gore (spelled like it is pronounced!).

Which leads to the answer to the Lila Cadieux Young and George Milton Young Great Saskatchewan mystery!

D S Fischer, of Medicine Hat AB (not far from Whiskey Creek) solved the mystery.

Our friendly 1916 census taker must have heard someone say “Whiska Creek” and decided it was an accented version of “Whiskey” Creek … so the 1916 census record placed several hundred people in “Whiskey” Creek!

Whiska Creek does still exist! It’s rural municipality 106, with offices of the Reeve (Mayor) in Vanguard SK. It’s population (2006) is 520 and its 329 square miles are mostly farmland.

A Mystery: Where is Whiskey Creek, SK?

George Milton Young and his wife Lila Cadieux Young married in 1911, and apparently headed out to homestead on the Prairies soon after. George’s obituary says that they were in Saskatchewan until 1919. Until recently, I had no idea where they had moved. But finding them in the 1916 Census of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba lessened the mystery only a little bit. George and Lila appear on the microfilmed census in a roll labelled for the Swift Current, SK, area.

George and Lila Young on a Whiskey Creek, SK, census page

Great! Under ‘Place of habitation’ they are residing in ‘Township 12, Range 10, Meridian [W] 3, Municipality Whiskey Creek.’ The Saskatchewan Archives confirms that paperwork for this property was filed by George Young. A large 1929 map of the Province, with survey grids, shows the 12-10-3 block on a spur of the Canadian Pacific Railway, but with no town or village name indicated.

The National Library and Archives in Ottawa has only one reference to Whiskey Creek: a 1937 CPR railwayman’s accident report. Otherwise, every other source, even published province directories from the time period, as well as the University of Saskatchewan Library catalogue and their archives, return no information about a Whiskey Creek!

See the June 6, 2011 post for the solution to this mystery!